Life in Missional Communities

Missional communities bear witness to the coming kingdom of God (Missional Church 101). Lesslie Newbigin lays the foundation for this understanding. In Sign of the Kingdom, Newbigin argues that in the Twentieth Century, the Church outsourced the primary functions of the witnessing community to other organizations. Caring for the widow and orphan was given to parachurch organizations. Evangelism was handed to organizations such as Crusade for Christ. The Church has given the ministry of the individual witness away to professional clergy. These are all functions that missional communities should play (59).

Newbigin paints a picture of a church whose people are deeply connected to the hurts and troubles of the neighborhood. The connection to the neighborhood becomes their witness because it flows from relationship with God. “Then it is possible for the outsider to see that the one springs from the other and he is led to ask about the spring from which faith, hope and love flow. The compassion and the action of the church members then become signs that point beyond themselves” (61).

Some of the pioneers in discussing the life of the missional community are Michael Frost and Alan Hirsch. If the Gospel and Our Culture Network (GOCN) is the academic trunk of the missional movement, then Frost and Hirsch are the first well known practitioners. With experience in turning dying congregations into community embracing and life changing vessels of God, Hirsch and Frost bring a decidedly sociological focus to the missional conversation.

While the GOCN appear to hang in the areas of missiology and ecclesiology, Hirsch and Frost are forming a practical Christology. According to them, Christology (what we believe about Jesus) informs missiology (how we understand our purpose), which, in turn, shapes ecclesiology (how we form and structure the Church) (ReJesus 6). In their latest work, ReJesus, the authors openly criticize theologians for making Christology “a complex science that in effect excludes the theologically uninitiated person” (ReJesus 13). Through the Forge Training Network, the Forgotten Ways website, and numerous teaching engagements, Hirsch and Frost are positioning themselves to be equippers of the next church movement.

The Christendom church, according to Frost and Hirsch, is “attractional, dualistic, and hierarchical.” An attractional mode skews and distorts the gospel to be only about meeting the needs of the individual. A dualistic church holds such strict lines between the sacred and profane that God’s movement in the world cannot be detected. The hierarchical church is bloated with bureaucracy and cannot respond to quickly changing microcultures (The Shaping of Things to Come 18-21). In contrast, Frost and Hirsch are calling the church to be “incarnational, messianic, and apostolic.” Through being incarnational, the missional church moves out to be with people instead of expecting them to come to church. A messianic community does not present sharp contrasts between the sacred and profane. Instead, the messianic community practices an active faith in Jesus Christ. Lastly, instead of being top heavy and slow, the apostolic community is continually finding new people groups to reach and new places to take the gospel.

Furthering the discussion of missional communities, Hirsch makes distinction between “community” and “communitas” (The Forgotten Ways 217-241). Communitas happens when a group gathers around a certain purpose or change. Hirsch speaks of the communitas experienced among teenage boys as they experience changes in their role, their bodies, and their way of relating to one another. During that time, boys establish strong bonds. For the church, communitas occurs when people gather around mission. Hirsch, therefore, defines communitas as “the journey of a group of people that find each other only in a common pursuit of a vision and of a mission that lies beyond itself. Its energies are primarily directed outward and forward” (The Forgotten Ways 236).

While the shared mission of God forge missional communities, other markers of missional communities also exist. Frost and Hirsch talk specifically about how missional groups interact with the broader community. Rather than withdrawing or putting up facades, missional communities interact with the broader community with authenticity. This “incarnational” mark of missional groups seeks to create a “real connection” that shows the broader community that Jesus cares for them, a “real demonstration” that works on behalf of the broader community, “real access” through deep involvement in the community, and “real encounter” that plants Christ in the hearts of the people of the community (Shaping 73-74).

In a similar way, Neil Cole describes the missional community as being “organic.” As the missional community builds relationships, it should be able to shift and mold to respond to what is happening in the broader community. This makes for more dynamic leadership and organization. Cole presents an anatomical metaphor to make his point. The missional community is not bound by an exoskeleton that limits movement and growth. Instead, the structure of missional community acts as an endoskeleton that allows for growth and maturation in an organic way (Organic Church 125).

Next up:  Missional Leadership